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The Rife Machine Report

Chapter #16

John Marsh's 1980's
Ray tube Rife Machine

John Marsh's 1980's Rife machine

1) Used a ray tube.

2) RF Carrier frequency was set at 2.2 MHz

3) Used square wave audio frequencies modulated onto a sine wave carrier frequency.

4) Power usage was about 125 watts. Output to the ray tube about 25 to 30 watts.

This style of ray tube instrument Model JLMSQ-101, which was built in the 1980's, was the last design that John Marsh built before his death. All of his Rife Machines and Rife information were given to his nurse before his death. His equipment and documents were obtained from her in 2012. Since we were able to obtain this instrument we have been able date it and take better photos of the complete instrument. Some of this information and new photos are shown below and are now included in this report.

John Marsh built two different models of this style of Rife Machine. In the next two photos, shown below, we see the first model of this style of instrument. The instrument was a mix of both old vacuum tube technology and modern solid state technology. The audio oscillator was a solid state variable audio oscillator with a digital readout for displaying the frequencies. The frequency range went from about 20 Hertz to 20,000 Hertz. The instrument used the same low square wave audio frequencies that were used in the 1950’s AZ-58 Rife Machine built in 1953. Those thirteen frequencies were 120, 660, 712, 727, 776, 784, 800, 803, 880, 1552, 1862, 2008, 2128. The RF carrier frequency section was built using old vacuum tube technology. The RF carrier frequency was set at 2,200,000 Hertz. This RF carrier frequency again shows that John Marsh did not understand the harmonic sideband method that Philip Hoyland used in the original Rife Ray #5 or Beam Ray Clinical Rife Machine sold by the 1938-1939 Beam Ray Corporation. His earlier 1971 instrument which was discussed in Chapter 15 of this report used a 4.150 MHz (4,150,000 Hertz) RF carrier frequency. Both of these RF carrier frequencies (2.2 MHz and 4.150 MHz) clearly show that Philip Hoyland's sideband method was not used. What became of this instrument is not known. John Marsh most likely sold it to someone because he was building these for a few people who wanted them.

Marsh's 1980's Rife Machine replica
Marsh Rife Machine 1980's Model

In the next photo, shown below, we see John Marsh's second style of Rife Machine. This is the same machine shown above in the first photo of this chapter. This machine John Marsh used until his death in 1987. This machine was given to his nurse. We now have this machine and know how it worked. The instrument uses the same low square wave audio frequencies that were used in the 1953 AZ-58 Rife Machine. This instrument was unique because he did not have it built with a variable audio oscillator. Instead it had a dial which had 13 different positions for the 13 different audio frequencies which he used. John also had this instruments RF section built using old vacuum tube technology. The RF carrier frequency was also set to 2,200,000 Hertz (2.20 MHz). The fact that this instrument is still being used even after about thirty years speaks of its quality of construction.

Marsh's 1980's Rife Machine replica

In the next photo, shown below, we see John Marsh with this instrument in the 1980's shortly before his death.

Marsh Rife Machine 1980's Model

The ray tube used with this instrument has an interesting design because it was designed to stand up. In the new photo, show below, you can see an up close view of this ray tube.

Marsh Rife Ray Tube

Below is a photo of the inside of the case that held the ray tube. You will notice that the ray tube is darkened. This happens to this type of ray tube because the metal electrodes are on the inside of the ray tube. When the ray tube is lit the metal comes of the electrodes and over time slowly contaminates the gas and the interior of the tube. The metal deposits or coats the inside of the ray tube and then the ray tube becomes less effective. In many cases the ray tube begins to sputter requiring it to be replaced or cleaned out and re-gassed. The photo of the new ray tube, shown above, is one of the extra ray tubes that John had built for this instrument. Many people no longer use ray tubes with internal electrodes because of this problem. The tubes without internal electrodes last for many years without any need of replacement. Some people have used them for more than 15 years and the ray tubes are still working without any problems.

Marsh Rife Ray Tube

The photo, shown below, is the underside of the instrument with the bottom removed.

Marsh Rife Machine Underside

The next picture is a photo of the instrument with the top cover removed.

Marsh Rife Machine Top Off

The next two photo's, shown below, are a close up of the RF carrier frequency section showing the RF tank coil and the two variable tuning capacitors for tuning the RF carrier frequency to 2.2 MHz and for tuning the ray tube resonance.

Marsh Rife Machine 1980 RF Section
Marsh Rife Machine 1980 RF Section

In the next photo, shown below, you can see the two brass colored nuts with regular screw driver slots. The one on the left labeled “Load” was for tuning the ray tube and the other on the right which is labeled “Tune” was for tuning the carrier frequency.

Marsh Rife Machine Back

The next photo, shown below, is a side view of the instrument showing the electronics for the thirteen square wave audio frequencies.

Marsh Rife Machine 1980's Side View

In the next photo, show below you can see the tuning dial for each of the thirteen square wave audio frequencies. The dial started with the lowest audio frequency and went to the highest. The audio frequencies went in clockwise order from the first setting to the last setting 120, 660, 712, 727, 776, 784, 800, 803, 880, 1552, 1862, 2008, 2128.

Marsh Rife Machine Front

The next photo, shown below, is of the typed writing that John Marsh had put on the front of this instrument.

Marsh Rife Machine 1980's Label

The final photo, shown below, is of the machine with the ray tube lit. The ray tube would be a lot brighter if the tube was in new condition.

Marsh Rife Machine Ray Tube Lit

Chapter Summary: This instrument built by John Marsh used the same frequencies as the 1953 AZ-58. It also worked on the same low audio frequency square wave harmonics method as the AZ-58. The power level was lower than the AZ-58 and his 1970's AZ 58 replica discussed in chapter 15 of this report. This instrument was the last ray tube instrument John Marsh built before his death in 1987.

The next chapter will be a summary of the complete "Rife Machine Report."